The Concorde in HDR, Air & Space Museum


I have a fascination with airplanes of all types and descriptions since I was first introduced to them as a child by my father and visited and toured the military air shows and climbed into the cockpit and saw those amazing shiny controls and objects.  I was hooked and had the privilege of visiting many shows, airfields/airports/military installations, NASA and museums with my family.  The National Air & Space Museum in Washington, DC and Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Virginia are a favorite annually as there is so much to see, study and photograph.  The image above of “The Concorde” is from my latest visit and processed HDR.

Concorde, Fox Alpha, Air France

“The first supersonic airliner to enter service, the Concorde flew thousands of passengers across the Atlantic at twice the speed of sound for over 25 years. Designed and built by Aérospatiale of France and the British Aviation Corporation, the graceful Concorde was a stunning technological achievement that could not overcome serious economic problems.

In 1989, Air France signed a letter of agreement to donate a Concorde to the National Air and Space Museum upon the aircraft’s retirement. On June 12, 2003, Air France honored that agreement, donating Concorde F-BVFA to the Museum upon the completion of its last flight. This aircraft was the first Air France Concorde to open service to Rio de Janeiro, Washington, D.C., and New York and had flown 17,824 hours.

Dimensions:
Wingspan: 25.56 m (83 ft 10 in)
Length: 61.66 m (202 ft 3 in)
Height: 11.3 m (37 ft 1 in)
Weight, empty: 79,265 kg (174,750 lb)
Weight, gross: 181,435 kg (400,000 lb)
Top speed: 2,179 km/h (1350 mph)
Engine: Four Rolls-Royce/SNECMA Olympus 593 Mk 602, 17,259 kg (38,050 lb) thrust each
Manufacturer: Société Nationale Industrielle Aérospatiale, Paris, France, and British Aircraft Corporation, London, United Kingdom

The Concorde is now prominently displayed at the Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center.”
Visit the Air & Space Museum @ Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center here.
Download the .pdf for details here

This full view image is courtesy of the National Air & Space Museum.

Space Shuttle Discovery in HDR

As Washingtonians, we have grown up in the great Smithsonian Institute museums and they are a large part of our photography life.  We love photographing in Washington DC for events and pleasure.  It is one of the most beautiful cities in the United States and the architecture and museums offer visitors such a plethora of subjects to study and for photogs, to photograph.  Our favorites are the air and space museums in both locations of DC and Northern Virginia.  The National Air & Space Museum  at  Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va houses the Space Shuttle Discovery and is a favorite to photograph.  We visited again recently at a quieter hour where we could capture more of the Discovery and museum.

Air& Space

The space shuttle Discovery is the centerpiece of the James S. McDonnell Space Hangar at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va.

Visit the National Air&Space Museum.

The Vought & Blackbird Aircraft in HDR

Vought F4U-1D Corsair

By V-J Day, September 2, 1945, Corsair pilots had amassed an 11:1 kill ratio against enemy aircraft. The aircraft’s distinctive inverted gull-wing design allowed ground clearance for the huge, three-bladed Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propeller, which spanned more than 4 meters (13 feet). The Pratt and Whitney R-2800 radial engine and Hydromatic propeller was the largest and one of the most powerful engine-propeller combinations ever flown on a fighter aircraft.

Charles Lindbergh flew bombing missions in a Corsair with Marine Air Group 31 against Japanese strongholds in the Pacific in 1944. This airplane is painted in the colors and markings of the Corsair Sun Setter, a Marine close-support fighter assigned to the USS Essex in July 1944.

Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird

No reconnaissance aircraft in history has operated globally in more hostile airspace or with such complete impunity than the SR-71, the world’s fastest jet-propelled aircraft. The Blackbird’s performance and operational achievements placed it at the pinnacle of aviation technology developments during the Cold War.

This Blackbird accrued about 2,800 hours of flight time during 24 years of active service with the U.S. Air Force. On its last flight, March 6, 1990, Lt. Col. Ed Yielding and Lt. Col. Joseph Vida set a speed record by flying from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., in 1 hour, 4 minutes, and 20 seconds, averaging 3,418 kilometers (2,124 miles) per hour. At the flight’s conclusion, they landed at Washington-Dulles International Airport and turned the airplane over to the Smithsonian.