Photography: Lines, Frames, Shadows

Photographing lines, frames, shadows and light reflections are a favorite for us and we are never without many opportunities when traveling for architectural, industrial and city shoots.   These subjects are always in our thinking when we travel to ocean and mountain destinations as well.  The “one-half mile long  bridge” (Fort Cinch Pier) from land to ocean is one of those great spots to capture the varying lines and shadows that frame the scene before you as you walk out and return.  One must not get lost in the capture of them to forget the beauty of light, colors and scene before them.  Our motto: Study the scene but also capture the lines, frames and shadows.

JayJacy.com

 

 

See our earlier photography and informational post on the Fort Cinch Pier here.
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Walking A Mile on Water

Fort Clinch Pier

The Fort Clinch Pier is 2400 feet long+- one-half mile out to its end which overlooks the water on three sides and a fabulous view back to the beach.  Walking “the mile on water” is fabulous and one sees, feels and is mesmerized by its awesome vistas.   Whether a fisherman/woman, walker, historian or photographer, there is much to take in and photograph at this fabulous place.

Fort Clinch State Park

The site of Fort Clinch on Amelia Island at the entrance to the St. Marys River and Cumberland Sound has been occupied by various military troops since 1736. Construction of the existing fort was begun in 1847 as part of the Third American System building program, which also included Fort Pulaski further up the coast in Georgia. A pentagonal brick fort with both inner and outer walls, Fort Clinch was a safe haven for blockade runners during the Civil War. Briefly occupied by Confederate forces, its recapture by Federal troops in early 1862 gave the Union control of the adjacent Georgia and Florida coasts. The fort was used in 1898 during the Spanish-American War, but was abandoned until the Civil Conservation Corps (CCC) restored it in the 1930s. A Florida State Park, Fort Clinch is interpreted as the base of Union operations in the area throughout the Civil War.”

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